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Undergraduate Module Descriptor

LAW1027C: Constitutional Law

This module descriptor refers to the 2022/3 academic year.

Module Content

Syllabus Plan

Whilst the precise content may vary from year to year, it is envisaged that the syllabus will cover all or some of the following topics:

  • The concept of constitutionalism
  • The history, concepts, traditions and principles of the constitution
  • Constitutional conventions
  • The Crown and government
  • Parliamentary supremacy
  • The rule of law and the separation of powers
  • Judicial review
  • Public inquiries
  • Devolution
  • Institutional structure, decision-making procedures, and legislative process of the EU
  • Sources of EU law
  • Principles of supremacy and direct effect
  • Enforcement of EU law against member states
  • References for preliminary rulings
  • Aspects of the single market
  • Legal ramifications of Brexit

Learning and Teaching

This table provides an overview of how your hours of study for this module are allocated:

Scheduled Learning and Teaching ActivitiesGuided independent studyPlacement / study abroad
26.5123.5

...and this table provides a more detailed breakdown of the hours allocated to various study activities:

CategoryHours of study timeDescription
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities1111 x 1-hour synchronous weekly lectures
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities10.57 x 1.5 teacher-led seminars
Scheduled Learning and Teaching Activities5Essay-writing workshops
Guided Independent Study58Preparation for scheduled learning and teaching sessions, including pre-reading and the completion of learning activities. Individual reading
Guided Independent Study1111 x 1-hour peer-led firm meetings
Guided Independent Study54.5Assessment preparation

Online Resources

This module has online resources available via ELE (the Exeter Learning Environment).

ELE – vle.exeter.ac.uk

Other Learning Resources

You are expected to keep up to date with topical events. This is best done by reading newspapers such as The Times, The Guardian, The Independent or The Telegraph. You may also find recent and current editions of specialist journals, such as Public Law and Modern Law Review, which are available digitally in the Law Library, useful for this purpose.